FEATURED MEMBERS

The American Art Therapy Association represents a diversity of professionals, students, and organizations across the nation. We recognize and celebrate the work of our members at all levels through our Featured Member series.

 

“Untitled” By Annie McFarland.

Alcohol ink and metallic pen. 2018.

“Needing a Home” by Michelle Anne Hololob.

Mixed media.

“This is a response piece to the continued frustrations dealing with my patients suffering with the broken shelter system. More and more people are coming in dealing with homelessness, and, as a therapist, it is hard not to feel powerless at times. I painted with acrylics, dispelling some frustration and finding it unfinished, found the collage piece that seemed to contain all that energy.”

“Metro Riders” by Jordan Potash.

2018. Acrylic on canvas.

“I started sketching people in public places as a way to pass the time and liven up an otherwise dull commute. What I found was that I developed a remote sense of intimacy with each subject. Public transportation is an odd space in that we all share it, but try our best to interact with others as little as possible.

This scene comprises several sketches from my commute over months. I sketched some of the individuals for almost a full commute, while others were only on the train for a few stops. Even though I do not know anything about any of these people, as I reviewed my sketches and translated them to the canvas, I felt as if I was painting the portraits of long forgotten friends.”

“Ruby” by Kortney Malone.

From nursing home portrait series. Pastel on paper. 2004.

“As an artist, my creativity is my voice. It sustains me mentally and emotionally in my best and worst moments. Growing up and in my adulthood, I often find art is my free space in life where I can recharge and gain self-awareness, have a window into myself where I choose to be at ease or be challenged, but ultimately art making for me is a place of change to use to connect with others.”

“Staying Afloat” by Ashley Rivera.

February 2018. Tissue paper, water-soluble oil pastels, yarn, and cardboard.

“I Am Enough” by Trica Zeyher.

Mixed media. January 2019.

AATA 2018 Conference Logo Artist Contribution by Nina Hausfeld.

“This watercolor was created during a demo for one of my art groups.  The technique we used incorporated wet on wet watercolor painting and plastic wrap.  This technique allows for the beautiful blending of colors while also making space for the emergence of the unintentional and often surprising shapes, marks and patterns left by the lifting of the paint by the plastic wrap.

In a sense, this process invites us to be completely present and intentional while also letting go of control and trusting in the power of the creative process to reveal to us it’s beauty and meaning.  I find that the approach required to complete this project is a wonderful metaphor for approaching life in general: maintaining presence in the face of the unknown and trusting in the outcome.”

“The Struggle” by Charles Anderson.

Acrylic Painting.

“The sun represents the overpowering pressure of opposition.  Notice the arms and body postures for some individuals in the painting as they enter the struggle.  One individual is about to overcome and in the process begins to sink into the earth.  Another individual notices the person sinking and prepares to help the individual from sinking deeper.

Each individual in the picture represents many individuals who will one day overcome their struggles, but the impact leaves a sting that changes their view.  A view of how they see themselves and the world around them for they will never be the same.”

“Untitled” by Christianne Strang.

2016.  Mixed media/watercolor.

“I’m able to create art fairly frequently. Most often I use a mixed media technique that I call reverse coloring.  The first layer is wet-on-wet watercolor that, when dry, can serve as the basis for a design.  It can be as simple as outlining the gradations of colors to create an abstract design – a doodle that results from the outlining of colors instead of coloring in the lines.”

Kortney Malone, MPS, LMHC

Kortney Malone, MPS, LMHC

April 25, 2019 

“As an artist, my creativity is my voice. It sustains me mentally and emotionally in my best and worst moments. Growing up and in my adulthood, I often find art is my free space in life where I can recharge and gain self-awareness, have a window into myself where I choose to be at ease or be challenged, but ultimately art making for me is a place of change to use to connect with others.”

Colleen Ferguson Kahn, MA, MFT, ATR-BC,

Colleen Ferguson Kahn, MA, MFT, ATR-BC,

April 18, 2019

“Through art therapy interventions, I help cultivate wellbeing by identifying and reframing maladaptive thought patterns and behaviors. Art therapy in the pediatric hospital setting can help alleviate symptoms such as stress, anxiety, depression and loss pf control associated with hospitalization. Providing patient with a safe, trusting space to creatively express themselves while genuinely treating the patient with unconditional regard is paramount.”  

Patrica Zeyher

Patrica Zeyher

April 11, 2019

For the future of the profession, she hopes to see continued growth in public understanding of art therapy and the further development of virtual art therapy “as technology advances alongside human creativity and consciousness.”