Resources

Findings from AATA’s Coronavirus Pandemic Impact Survey

Findings from AATA’s Coronavirus Pandemic Impact Survey

August 14, 2020 

To better understand how art therapists are responding to the Coronavirus pandemic and coping themselves, the American Art Therapy Association (AATA) conducted an online survey of art therapy professionals, educators, and students in May 2020. The findings offer a look into the impact of the Coronavirus pandemic on art therapists, the clients they serve, as well as access to mental health care. (Download the full report.)

From an Online Art Therapy Grad Student, Here are 5 Tips for Making the Transition to Virtual

From an Online Art Therapy Grad Student, Here are 5 Tips for Making the Transition to Virtual

April 6, 2020 | Trica Zeyher

When I found out that my internship site was going to be transitioning to telehealth therapy from face-to-face services due to coronavirus social distancing, I felt prepared from my online graduate experiences. Edinboro University’s online art therapy program provided me with practice to succeed even in these challenging times. Here are my top 5 tips of how to succeed in an online art therapy master’s program.

Best Practices for Using Art Supplies Hygienically during the COVID-19 Outbreak

Best Practices for Using Art Supplies Hygienically during the COVID-19 Outbreak

March 16, 2020 | Andrea Davis

As we navigate the current coronavirus pandemic, it is a good time to be mindful about art supplies and ways to prevent the spread of illness. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) describes COVID-19 as an airborne illness. Droplets in the air can be breathed in and also land on surfaces including work spaces and art supplies. Protecting clients from harm includes having clean art supplies.

AATA Statement on the Developing Coronavirus Pandemic

AATA Statement on the Developing Coronavirus Pandemic

March 12. 2020

The American Art Therapy Association (AATA) shares in the concerns we are facing as a nation and a global community regarding the dynamic developments of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. We stand with our art therapy community and people around the world, keeping everyone’s health—physical and emotional—as our number one priority.

The Traumatic Impact and Aftereffects of Gun-Related Violence

The Traumatic Impact and Aftereffects of Gun-Related Violence

April 11, 2019 

As the nation’s leading non-profit organization for advancing the art therapy profession, the American Art Therapy Association (AATA) provides our members and the public we serve with important content to support the wellbeing of all individuals, families, and communities.  The following resource offer information about the traumatic impact and aftereffects of gun-related violence in our communities, families, and schools, as well as in the media.

World Mental Health Day

World Mental Health Day

October 10, 2018 

In recognition of this global awareness effort, the American Art Therapy Association (AATA) offers the following resources on mental health, art therapy, and the Association’s advocacy and awareness efforts.

Suicide Prevention and Awareness Best Practices for Art Therapists and Resources for the Public

Suicide Prevention and Awareness Best Practices for Art Therapists and Resources for the Public

September 13, 2018 

This AATA resource offers information and best practices for art therapists and other mental health clinicians to support suicide prevention and awareness for our clients, families, communities, and survivors.  Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States, and nearly 45,000 Americans die by suicide every year, according to statistics published the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP).

June is Pride Month: Here’s what art therapists need to know

June is Pride Month: Here’s what art therapists need to know

By Daniel Blausey | June 21, 2018 | #WeAreArtTherapists

For art therapists, Pride Month is not only a time to celebrate, commemorate, and march proudly in solidarity, it is also a time to reflect on the shifting political and cultural fronts impacting our clients within the LGBTQIA community on a day-to-day basis. It is important to recognize the varying social locations — cultural backgrounds such as religion, language, cuisine, social habits, arts, and specific family history of race, gender, socio-economic status, and education — that intersect for each of our clients, potentially manifesting as depression, suicidality, anger, low self-worth or any combination of emotions.